Are You in a Cult? – Do you want to be? The Cult Checklist

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Do you think you are in a cult?  Then you are in luck, because the fine folks over at the International Cultic Studies Association has put together the ‘Cults 101: Checklist of Cult Characteristics’

Before going on, I must say that the International Cultic Studies Associations was founded by the group American Family Foundation.  The American Family Foundation mission goal is,

To help spread the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the unsaved of the world focusing on the family for this endeavor.

and they have this photo (pictured to the lower right) on their front page. So they know a little about spotting cults.  [singlepic id=258 w=320 h=240 float=right]

Taken from their page is this Checklist to finding out if you or someone you know is in a cult, but remember that this list is not meant to be a “cult scale” or a definitive checklist to determine if a specific group is a cult. This is not so much a diagnostic instrument as it is an analytical tool.  The good news is that you can use it  as a tool if you are looking to join a cult. Is there better way to find a cult without this ‘analytical tool’ ?- I think not.

Concerted efforts at influence and control lie at the core of cultic groups, programs, and relationships. Many members, former members, and supporters of cults are not fully aware of the extent to which members may have been manipulated, exploited, even abused. The following list of social-structural, social-psychological, and interpersonal behavioral patterns commonly found in cultic environments may be helpful in assessing a particular group or relationship.

Compare these patterns to the situation you were in (or in which you, a family member, or friend is currently involved). This list may help you determine if there is cause for concern. Bear in mind that this list is not meant to be a “cult scale” or a definitive checklist to determine if a specific group is a cult. This is not so much a diagnostic instrument as it is an analytical tool.

The group displays excessively zealous and unquestioning commitment to its leader and (whether he is alive or dead) regards his belief system, ideology, and practices as the Truth, as law.

Questioning, doubt, and dissent are discouraged or even punished.

Mind-altering practices (such as meditation, chanting, speaking in tongues, denunciation sessions, and debilitating work routines) are used in excess and serve to suppress doubts about the group and its leader(s). (I am looking in your direction, O.F.D.)

The leadership dictates, sometimes in great detail, how members should think, act, and feel (for example, members must get permission to date, change jobs, marry—or leaders prescribe what types of clothes to wear, where to live, whether or not to have children, how to discipline children, and so forth).

The group is elitist, claiming a special, exalted status for itself, its leader(s) and members (for example, the leader is considered the Messiah, a special being, an avatar—or the group and/or the leader is on a special mission to save humanity).

The group has a polarized us-versus-them mentality, which may cause conflict with the wider society.

The leader is not accountable to any authorities (unlike, for example, teachers, military commanders or ministers, priests, monks, and rabbis of mainstream religious denominations).

The group teaches or implies that its supposedly exalted ends justify whatever means it deems necessary. This may result in members’ participating in behaviors or activities they would have considered reprehensible or unethical before joining the group (for example, lying to family or friends, or collecting money for bogus charities).

The leadership induces feelings of shame and/or guilt iin order to influence and/or control members. Often, this is done through peer pressure and subtle forms of persuasion.

Subservience to the leader or group requires members to cut ties with family and friends, and radically alter the personal goals and activities they had before joining the group.

The group is preoccupied with bringing in new members.

The group is preoccupied with making money.

Members are expected to devote inordinate amounts of time to the group and group-related activities.

Members are encouraged or required to live and/or socialize only with other group members.

The most loyal members (the “true believers”) feel there can be no life outside the context of the group. They believe there is no other way to be, and often fear reprisals to themselves or others if they leave (or even consider leaving) the group.

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About author

Jason Bayless

Jason Bayless is a life-long activist and is currently working at The Pachamama Alliance. When he is not working he spends, working with Center for Farmworker Families and spending his time recording shows, writing blogs, collecting 3D movies, and playing VR games.

Comments
  • Eric Hamell3

    January 29, 2010

    You’ve confused two different groups here. The predecessor of ICSA was the American Family Foundation, but the mission you quote is that of the American Family ASSOCIATION. Totally different! AFA are Religious Right activists, whereas AFF (now ICSA) are mainly mental health professionals. They are a decidedly non-ideological group.

    Reply
  • Billy Bob4

    May 13, 2009

    thems there some big words you usin. I aints got no times for this here blog no more.
    goin fishin now
    God Bless
    BB

    Reply
  • Jason Bayless5

    May 12, 2009

    Billy, please note – “that this list is not meant to be a “cult scale” or a definitive checklist to determine if a specific group is a cult. This is not so much a diagnostic instrument as it is an analytical tool.”

    Reply
  • Khayyam Wakil6

    May 12, 2009

    Are You in a Cult? – Do you want to be? The Cult Checklist | http://bit.ly/SW3y4

    Reply
  • Jason Bayless7

    May 12, 2009

    New blog post: Are You in a Cult? – Do you want to be? The Cult Checklist https://www.zombie-popcorn.com/?p=2349

    Reply
  • Billy Bob8

    May 12, 2009

    This here little post sounds like them peoples you escaped from at peta!

    Reply

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